Posts Tagged ‘energy’

Maori call for a fundamental and philosophical shift in climate change policy in New Zealand

June 14, 2012

The New Zealand Government primary policy response to climate change has been the introduction of the Emissions Trading System (ETS), a cap and trade systems that places a price on carbon. The last 3 to 4 years the government has introduced the ETS and is currently looking to refine and fine tune the policy settings of the ETS.

Maori have signalled strongly to Government that the time is now right to shift the focus of climate change policy in New Zealand:

The ETS is fast becoming business as usual for many including farmers. The Government’s discussion document sets out a number of amendments to the ETS that will be introduced in 2012.

We support the Government’s approach to refine the ETS policy settings. However, we promote strongly that the Government shift its focus towards the development and introduction of a suite of complimentary measures as we propose above that work in parallel with the ETS towards a holistic response on climate change in line with the issues raised by Iwi/Māori raised in the Regional hui set out later in this document.

Read more here…

The focus with the ETS has been to migrate sectors into the ETS that began with Forestry with Agriculture programmed to enter in 2015. There is growing evidence that as companies and sectors have been introduced and become increasingly familiar with the complexities of the ETS, whereby making it (the ETS) increasingly business as usual. Indeed, Maori have argued that business certainty is vital and that government should ensure they don’t introduce major policy swings.

Given this, it is timely now that Government should hold to the fundamentals of its cap and trade system, (and indeed refine the system) but not spend the next 3 to 5 years on the ETS and now shift its focus on to a suite of new complimentary measures like investment into low emission technologies, renewable energy technologies and more..

What do you think?

 

 

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Sustainable development – Renewable energy and clean-tech jobs

December 10, 2011

Changes in renewable energy markets, investments, industries, and policies have been so rapid in recent years that perceptions of the status of renewable energy can lag years behind the reality. This report captures that reality and provides a unique overview of renewable energy worldwide as of early 2011.

Renewables 2011 Global Status Report

In several countries, renewables represent a rapidly growing share of total energy supply, including heat and transport. For example:

  • In the United States, renewable energy accounted for about 10.9% of domestic primary energy production (compared with nuclear’s 11.3%), an increase of 5.6% relative to 2009.
  • China added an estimated 29 GW of grid-connected renewable capacity, for a total of 263 GW, an increase of 12% compared with 2009. Renewables accounted for about 26% of China’s total installed electric capacity, 18% of generation, and more than 9% of final energy consumption in 2010.
  • China now leads in several indicators of market growth: in 2010, it was the top installer of wind turbines and solar thermal systems and was the top hydropower producer. India is fifth worldwide in total existing wind power capacity and is rapidly expanding many forms of rural renewables such as biogas and solar PV. Brazil produces virtually all of the world’s sugar-derived ethanol and has been adding new hydropower, biomass, and wind power plants, as well as solar heating systems.
  • Germany met 11% of its total final energy consumption with renewable sources, which accounted for 16.8% of electricity consumption, 9.8% of heat production (mostly from biomass), and 5.8% of transport fuel consumption. Wind power accounted for nearly 36% of renewable generation, followed by biomass, hydropower, and solar photovoltaics (PV).

Clean energy investment storms to new record in 2010

New investment in clean energy reached $243bn last year, driven by soaring activity in China, offshore wind and European rooftop photovoltaics:

  • Investment in small-scale, distributed generation projects surged by 91% last year to $59.6bn, with the dominant element rooftop and other small-scale solar projects, notably in Germany but also in the US, the Czech Republic, Italy and elsewhere.
  • Investment in China was up 30% to $51.1bn in 2010, by far the largest figure for any country. In 2009 Asia and Oceania overtook the Americas, and in 2010 it narrowed the gap further on Europe, Middle East and Africa as the leading region of the world for clean energy investment.
  • Offshore wind finance had another good year in 2010, led by a $1.7bn package to fund the next, 295MW phases of the Thornton Bank offshore wind farm off the coast of Belgium, and a $1bn deal to finance the Borkum West II project in German waters.
  • Research and development spending on clean energy technologies by companies and governments grew to a record level in 2010, according to Bloomberg New Energy Finance data. Within this, the main constituent was government R&D, which reached $21bn, up from $15.8bn in 2009, while corporate R&D recovered from 2009’s recession-hit figure of $12.8bn, to reach $14.4bn, giving a total for global clean energy R&D of $35.5bn.
Total new investment 2004 to 2010

Total new investment 2004 to 2010

Read more here from Bloomberg New Energy Finance …

Clean-tech jobs

One of the forces propelling renewable energy policies and development is the potential to create new industries and generate new jobs. Jobs from renewables number in the hundreds of thousands in several countries. Globally, there are more than 3.5 million direct jobs in renewable energy industries, about half of them in the biofuels industry, with additional indirect jobs well beyond this figure.

Click here to read the full Renewables 2011 Global Status Report.

The evidence is clear – isn’t it?

 

Tell us what do you think?

 

 


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