Posts Tagged ‘economic’

Iwi welcome Durban Climate-change Agreement

December 19, 2011

Significant economic footprint

With a $NZ37 billion economic footprint representing approximately 20 percent of GNI, Iwi/Maori are rapidly becoming a formidable force within the New Zealand economy. This represents both significant opportunities, and risks and challenges for Maori. With much of this interest concentrated in the primary sector, there is significant risk and exposure to climate change policy and rule development both domestically and internationally to ensure these fast-emerging rules account for the particular interests of Iwi and Maori.

In the lead up to the Durban climate change negotiations in South Africa, through submissions to the Emissions Trading System Review Panel and a series of regional hui, Iwi/Maori have been signaling consistent and strong interest in the development of New Zealand’s climate change policy and linkages to international Kyoto Protocol rules says Dr. Apirana Mahuika, Chairman of the Climate Change Iwi Leadership Group…. (read more)

The next 1 to 3 years will be important as we continue to actively participate in the definition of international and refined domestic (ETS) rules like flexible land-use, harvested wood products and NZU allocations, to ensure they do account for the significant interests of Iwi/Maori says Mr. Chris Insley, Climate Change advisor to the Iwi Leadership Group and member of the New Zealand delegation in Durban.

As well, during this period we will expect to see practical emphasis and commitment by government to a range of complimentary measures like those we have seen with the successful home insulation program delivered to Maori living in our hapu communities says Dr. Mahuika.

New Zealand is committing $10’s million into international programs like the Global Research Alliance for Agriculture and the Green Climate Fund. While these initiatives send useful signals from New Zealand internationally, practically they are unlikely to deliver anything meaningful to our Maori farmers facing entry into the ETS says Mr. Insley.

We need to see the same kind of investment into research and technology to find practical low emissions technologies and solutions for our Maori farmers and cleantech products and services arising from our significant sector interests and certainly in the renewable energy sector says Mr. Insley… (read more)

Sustainability

Sustainability (or kaitiakitanga) is a fundamental value driver to Iwi/Maori where things should be done in balance where only so much should be taken such that there remains sufficient to ensure especially natural resources can be sustained in perpetuity for future generations. The development and confirmation of international and domestic climate change rules too are similarly guided by such principles meaning a very strong alignment between a key value driver for Maori and governing climate change rules.

Equity and fairness

The climate change strategy for Iwi Maori is therefore to create and maximize new business development opportunity arising out of the climate change space while concurrently working solidly to minimize risks and exposures through strategic involvement into the shaping of climate change policy to ensure that these rules are equitable to the interests of Iwi/Maori such that that Iwi/Maori do not bear any disproportionate share of the inevitable burden of climate change policy aimed aimed reducing emissions from the NZ economy and indeed, the world.

Tell us what you think..

 

 

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The planet breathes a huge sigh of relief today

December 11, 2011

UN climate talks agree a legal pact on Global warming

Amid all the dooms-dayers, the UN climate change talks in Durban (South Africa) agreed a pact this morning that for the first time would force all the biggest polluters to take action to slow the pace of global changing.

Conference of the Parties Plenary

Conference of the Parties Plenary

 

The deal follows years of failed attempts to impose legally-binding, international cuts on emerging giants, such as China and India.

The developed world had already accepted formal targets under a first phase of the Kyoto Protocol, which runs out at the end of next year, although the United States had never ratified its commitment.

After days of emotional debate, the chairwoman of the United Nations climate talks urged delegates to approve four packages, which have legal force.

“We came here with plan A, and we have concluded this meeting with plan A to save one planet for the future of our children and our grandchildren to come,” South African Foreign Minister Maite Nkoana-Mashabane said.

“We have made history,” she said, bringing the hammer down on more than two weeks of sometimes fractious talks in the South African port of Durban, the longest in two decades of UN climate talks.

The deal was welcomed by Brazil, one of the globe’s emerging economic powers.

“I am relieved we have what we came here to get. We have a robust outcome, an excellent text about a new phase in the international fight against climate change. It clearly points to action,” said Brazil’s climate envoy Luiz Alberto Figueiredo.

The Durban talks had been due to wrap up on Friday, but dragged into a second extra day on Sunday because of disputes over how to phrase the legal commitment.

The European Union pushed for strong wording and the three biggest emitters the United States, China and India resisted.

“We’ve had very intense discussions, we were not happy with reopening the text, but in the spirit of flexibility and accommodation shown by all, we have shown our flexibility, we have agreed to the words you just mentioned and we agree to adopt it,” India’s Environment Minister Jayanthi Natarajan said.

But environmentalists and small island states, which fear they literally could sink under the rising sea levels caused by climate change, have said it is still not strong enough.

Source: The Daily Star

While it is literally only a matter of a couple of hours or so since the negotiations have ended with this new agreement, and the full agreement details understood and interpreted, this has to be a very, very good day to see all the countries of the world step up.

What do you think?

The $37 billion problem, or opportunity?

November 17, 2011

The New Zealand government commissioned a study released this year that estimated the size of the Maori economy at $37 billion. Up from around $16 billion when last measured in 2006. Now this sounds impressive. But, the study pointed out that the $37 billion should be much larger than this if Maori assets that are concentrated in the primary sector. These assets underperform their non-Maori equivalent assets that is, they don’t have the same level of productivity. The study pointed out that Innovation and technology were key to lifting the productivity of these assets.

Where the study fell short however, it didn’t say how to do this i.e. get Maori asset owners engaged practically with the New Zealand Innovation system and what are the challenges that Iwi/Maori face in trying to interface with this system. This interface represents a significant barrier to Iwi/Maori trying to break into this space and until someone starts thinking about this, $37 billion Maori asset will continue to underperform or, at best stagger and splutter along.

Now that’s not good for either Maori or, the New Zealand economy at large. Is it?

What do you think?


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